The Source for Whistleblowers, Journalists, Legislators & Academics

whistle-sl

The Source for Whistleblowers

WhistleblowerLaws.com provide the latest in Information, legal development, news and free consultation to those considering blowing the whistle on fraud.

states-sl

False Claims Acts

In addition to the Federal False Claims Act, 29 states, 2 cities and the District of Columbia have False Claims Acts.

Learn more
backed-by-sl

Backed by Experienced Attorneys

WhistleblowerLaws.com is backed by some of the most experienced attorneys in False Claims Act litigation.

Learn more

Frequently Asked Questions

Whistleblower FAQs

The laws governing whistleblowing and protecting whistleblowers can be confusing and complicated. We’ve answer some of the initial questions potential whistleblowers might have.

Whistleblower Protection

Many whistleblowers faced retaliation for shedding light on the truth. These statues provide protection to whistleblower.

News & Commentary

Stay up to date with news affecting whistleblowers and all things related to False Claims Act and Qui Tam litigation with insight and commentary by our Panels of experts.

Contact Us

If you think your employer is committing fraud, whether it involves pharmaceuticals, Medicaid and Medicare, Government contracting, defense contracting, securities, education or fraudulent loans and grants, contact us for answers you may have.


Contact WhistleblowerLaws.com. If you would like to speak to us, call 202-800-3001 or click here

Get in touch with us


WhistleblowerLaws blog

Corporate Compliance Programs: Pretext or Panacea?

Proponents of corporate compliance programs loudly sing their praises while detractors point to ceaseless prosecutions and a parade of civil suits—often resulting in multi-billion dollar verdicts or settlements—as evidence that they are ineffective. So, are corporate compliance programs a panacea or a pretext? The truth lies somewhere in between. As a threshold issue, corporations are for-profit institutions. Indeed, most corporations have a mandate to maximize profit for shareholders. This can encourage senior management to operate in grey areas, and regulators may later deem their actions (and board oversight of such actions) to violate a wide array of laws. Second, formalistic compliance programs are not enough to ensure internal reporting of potential fraud and are not enough to inspire companies to take appropriate corrective actions. Instead, as set forth below, companies must take steps to ensure effective implementation of compliance programs and foster a culture of corporate compliance. The countervailing factors that motivate officers and directors to engage in or acquiesce to fraudulent conduct or, alternatively, devise and implement an effective compliance program warrant in-depth treatment in a standalone piece. Here, I turn to answering the specific questions posed with these general principles in mind. Question 1: Do corporate compliance programs actually suppress information from regulatory oversight? Response: Yes, often appropriately. But meritorious—and sometimes non-meritorious—allegations of misconduct tend to get reported externally where internal responses are inadequate or the company has not created a culture of compliance and reporting. Recent reports, compiled through surveys of hundreds of senior executives from a broad range of industries, indicate

Read more

WhistleblowerLaws News

Corporate Compliance Programs: Pretext or Panacea?

Proponents of corporate compliance programs loudly sing their praises while detractors point to ceaseless prosecutions and a parade of civil suits—often resulting in multi-billion dollar verdicts or settlements—as evidence that they are ineffective. So, are corporate compliance programs a panacea or a pretext? The truth lies somewhere in between. As a

Read more

09

What is Qui Tam

In its simplest form, a qui tam lawsuit is brought by a citizen, known as a “relator” or whistleblower, against a company, person or entity, that he or she knows is cheating the federal or a state government in some way. Since the qui tam suit is brought in the name of the relator on behalf of the government, the government may actually join the case and litigate alongside the relator’s lawyers. Through this web site you can educate yourself on the process, the law, your rights and protection and contact a lawyer who can help advise you.

Read more about this and other Whistleblower Questions

09

What do I do?

If I Witness Corporate Misconduct, What Should I Do? Many corporations have internal compliance programs for corporate misconduct. These programs are, in theory, designed to provide an audience for workers who want to report unethical or illegal corporate conduct. The question of whether to report company misconduct internally is both personal and strategic. Those who have made the decision that the wrongdoing needs to be reported are probably ready to consult counsel. Legal counsel can be very helpful in providing guidance on how to best address wrongful conduct in the workplace.

Read more about this and other Whistleblower Questions

11

Am I protected?

This site list all the statues which protect whistleblowers from retaliation here. Federal law, for example, at 30 U.S.C. § 3730(h) provides for 2 times any back pay plus interest if you let go, suspended or demoted after reporting misconduct plus any special damages you might have suffered. This includes reinstatement of seniority status, reimbursement of litigation costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees. An employee may bring an action in the appropriate district court of the United States for the relief provided in this subsection.

Read more about this and other Whistleblower Questions

Get Organized

  • Who’s involved in the fraud
  • What actions do you think are fraudulent
  • when did the fraud occur
  • What role did those involved play
  • When did you find out
  • Have you talked to anyone
  • Have you lost your job
  • Have you already taken legal action
  • Contact us
Top